Bill's Nova Scotia Radio Site

Nova Scotia Fire Services
Last updated December 30, 2014

Related Page:  Fire lookout towers (DNR)

This page is intended to outline the radio communications aspect of Nova Scotia fire departments and does not in any way attempt to describe the apparatus used by those departments.

Any description of fire communications in Nova Scotia is going to be problematically complex, though I will keep it as simple as possible. 

Basically stated there are two layers of fire communications in the province:

At the local or regional level there are the systems operated by individual departments or groups of departments, almost all of which are on VHF, and which also involve several contracted dispatch centres.   Supplementing the locally operated systems is a legacy provincial network of VHF fire grid repeaters open to usage by any of the local departments, which to some extent does continue to happen.  The major exception to all of this is the Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency Service (HRFE or HRFES) that operates its own VHF dispatch system, as well as utilizes the province's trunk radio system (currently on 800 MHz, but soon to migrate to 700 MHz) for all of its operational communications.

Superimposed on the local and regional VHF system is a provincially mandated radio plan for fire departments that uses the Nova Scotia Trunked Mobile Radio System on 700 MHz frequencies.  The radio system and network itself is described elsewhere on this website.    This radio plan is being put into place over the course of the fall and winter of 2014/15 and builds on an earlier version on the previous trunk system.   The trunk fire network has the capability of replacing all the VHF two way systems in the province but not the VHF paging systems.    While some departments are in fact embracing the trunk system to a significant degree, it is expected that the existing VHF systems in most of the province will remain in use for some time to come, perhaps decades.  This is due to momentum and money.   In the first place there is not a great deal of perceived reason to make the switch, and and in the second, it will take a lot of money to replace the vhf radios, both portable and mobile.   The province has provided or "seeded" a generous but limited number of radios at no charge but they are insufficient in quantity to fully replace the VHF systems already in place.   A related factor is the understandable reluctance to abandon VHF systems that in some cases are themselves only recently upgraded.

This page is intended to be a description of both levels of fire communications in Nova Scotia.

 

1. The Underlying VHF System

There are a multitude of fire departments in Nova Scotia, most of which are rural and volunteer in nature.  There are also several town departments, some of which are at least partially staffed by career (paid) firefighters.    This is also the manning situation in the regional municipalities (Halifax, Cape Breton and Queens).  In some cases the town departments also serve surrounding rural areas that are outside the town boundaries, under contracts with the municipalities in which those areas are located.   

Fire Paging:  

In all cases fire departments are initially paged out via VHF transmitters.   Paging of course results from citizens calling 911 answering centres (PSAP's) or from other public service agencies such as EHS or police requesting services.   From the PSAP's the requests go to the dispatch centres (which in some cases are co-located) who send the page out to the appropriate departments or stations.   Some departments are self-paged, i.e. there is no dispatch centre involved.

VHF fire pages happen in two main ways.   In dial-up paging the dispatch centre reaches the paging transmitter by telephone line. In direct radio paging, the dispatch centre either directly transmits a page via a nearby tower, or it sends a radio signal on an input frequency to a more distant paging transmitter, which repeats it out on the paging frequency.    There is also a third method, used in HRM, in which pages go to distant VHF transmitters via dedicated fibre optic lines.   Also to be mentioned are store and forward pager transmitters, in which a page is transmitted on a main transmitter, picked up at another site off-air and then transmitted with a delay from the first transmission.

Dispatch Centres:

Dispatch centres are located in various locations in Nova Scotia.  There is no government-mandated system of dispatch centres, i.e. there is no division of the province into several similar non-overlapping zones.  In fact there is an overlap of service areas, and individual departments are free to enter into service contracts with any dispatch provider that has the capability of effectively reaching the area.   This means that if it were financially viable, Yarmouth Dispatch could provide service to Guysborough VFD.  This is not uncommon in other public safety sectors, such that park wardens in Nova Scotia could be dispatched from a centre in Calgary, a hypothetical but realistic scenario.

At present, the dispatch centres are as follows:

Scotia Business Centre in Bridgewater
Yarmouth Dispatch in Yarmouth
Digby Dispatch in Digby
Valley Dispatch in Kentville (this is the most widespread service provider, by far)
New Glasgow Police Department
Stellarton Police Department
Canso Dispatch
Shubie Radio in Shubenacadie (serving a few departments in Guysborough County)
Halifax IES (Integrated Emergency Services) in Dartmouth
and as well, Amherst and Truro Police departments serve their own town fire departments.

For a more in-depth description of the dispatch centres and their served areas, click NS FIRE DISPATCH CENTRES

 

Two-Way Communications (Dispatch and Operations):

Once paged, fire departments respond on operational frequencies.  In some cases there will be an initial dispatching frequency used for communications with the dispatch centre, for additional details, and for recording of en route communications (for accountability purposes).   On arrival, communications might be transferred to an OPS channel which may or may not be monitored by the dispatch centre.  In most cases dedicated OPS channels are not monitored by the dispatch centre, as they are likely to be simplex and not receivable at any significant distance from the fire scene.   In the case of HRFE, all OPS communications are closely monitored by dispatch.    This reflects the varying level of control or role played by dispatch centres.  In most cases they are simply sending out requests for service with a protocol to follow regarding what equipment to page out, and subsequently to record what apparatus is in use and where.  In other cases they actually have some role to play in directing or suggesting actions, but still subordinate to the on-scene commander.

In some many cases the fire paging frequency and the dispatch frequency are one and the same.  In other cases the paging frequency is just that, and you will not hear communications on that channel.  For example, in East Hants, a page for Elmsdale will go out over 153.77 MHz but the two-way communications with the dispatch centre and among responding units will be on 154.46 MHz.

As in other services using VHF, the radio system may be simplex or via a repeater.    While this is explained elsewhere in more detail, simplex implies that all users transmit directly to each other on a single frequency.  This means that for the most part the signals do not carry far, and therefore are most suitable for small areas of service.    More commonly there will be a repeater system, in which users transmit on "Frequency A" (input frequency) to an automatic repeater station generally located on high ground.  The signal is re-sent back out over a wider area to other users on "Frequency B" (output frequency).   Thus the radios transmit on one frequency and receive on the other.   In the example for East Hants noted above, the users transmit 160.035 MHz
to the repeater site, which sends the signal back out on 154.46 MHz.   While you could listen on the input frequency there isn't much point in doing so, and therefore scanner listeners will tune to 154.46 MHz, and in fact these East Hants transmissions can be heard over a very wide area even though the original signal might be coming from a radio sitting in a low area near East Gore.

Generally speaking in Nova Scotia, fire departments each have their own one or two radio channels but they may also install the frequencies of adjacent departments for easier mutual aid deployments.   There IS a dedicated mutual aid frequency of 153.83 MHz but it is of diminishing importance within the province.    In a few areas there is a cooperative and voluntary banding together of departments so that there is one frequency plan used by all members.  This is most advanced in East Hants and in Colchester County, and to a lesser extent in Cumberland.   For example, all departments in Colchester County (except the town of Truro) use 152.525 MHz for paging and for communications, along with a unified set of OPS channels.    Cumberland has for the most part a single paging and communications frequency of 152.75 MHz, and the Canso Strait area uses 153.92 for paging, but not for communications.

For a listing of fire departments in Nova Scotia and their paging and communications frequencies click the appropriate area link below.  Note that there are quite a number of variations from the general description provided above.  Halifax Fire is much different from all of the others in that it exclusively uses trunk radio for all its two-way communications, and is described in detail on its dedicated page.  Note that there are other fire services provided by DNR for forest lands, by Halifax Airport for airside incidents, and by DND for its own properties, and as well a number of private fire services within large corporations such as Michelin.  None of these are currently described in this webpage.

Note that these individual area webpages are each due for revision due to the introduction of TMR2, and as well may require other revisions.   These revisions will take place once the migration to TMR2 is completed.

Supplementing the VHF dispatch and communications systems covering most of Nova Scotia, there is a supplementary VHF system provided and maintained by the provincial government (NS Integrated Mobile Radio System or "IMRS")   This system is a legacy network of VHF repeaters located throughout the province.   In the past, up until the advent of the newer 800 MHz trunk system, these repeaters were interconnected and therefore able to be linked for widespread communications.  Today, each of these repeaters remain as stand-alone facilities and available for free use by fire departments and others.  The fire aspect of IMRS is often referred to as the "Fire Grid".   In some areas of the province these repeaters remain in common use, and in effect mean that the local departments do not have to expend funds on a self-owned repeater system.   In other areas they are now entirely unused but remain operational.  This is the case within Halifax Regional Municipality, where three of these repeaters exist but no fire stations have the equipment or need to use them.    Generally speaking however in the rest of the province they are just there, and occasionally have traffic.   One must wonder in some cases why they have been abandoned, as they are free to the users, and have excellent coverage.  For example the Barr Settlement repeater on 150.125 MHz in East Hants is very wide coverage but is almost never used though it does have a place in the East Hants frequency plan as OPS 8.

For a detailed list of this legacy fire grid system, along with other components of IMRS, click NS Fire Grid

1a. Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency Service

This fire service requires separate mention as its communications are entirely different from those of other fire departments in the province.  Not only is this by far the largest single fire department in Nova Scotia, it is the only one that does not employ VHF for its day to day operations, outside of paging.  In addition virtually none of what is presented in the following section regarding the use of the TMR2 will apply to HRFE.   Briefly put, the HRFE employs a network of VHF pagers to serve its numerous and widespread stations.  Once paged, all units respond on the trunk radio system (as of December 2014 still on TMR1 but expected to migrate to TMR1) using a set of HRFE talk groups, rather than using VHF or the provincial fire service talk groups described below.  HRFE units will have very limited access to some of the VFD talk groups for use in mutual aid or borderland incidents, and like all users of the TMR2 will have access to the suite of mutual assistance and liaison talk groups.   HRFE's present communications and general structure is described in detail on this page: HRM Fire & Emergency

2. Fire Services on the TMR2 System

The TMR2 is the Nova Scotia Trunked Mobile Radio System, 2nd edition.   This system is a 700 MHz P25 network that began to come into operation in mid-2014.  It is gradually replacing TMR1, an 800 MHz Motorola Type II Smartzone system.   The TMR1 and TMR2 networks are described in detail elsewhere on this website.   As of the last revision of this page in December 2014, all or most of the fire departments in the southwestern area of Nova Scotia had migrated to TMR2 from TMR1, with the remainder set to do so into the spring of 2015.  By the summer of 2015 all fire usage of TMR1 will have ended.  Due to this, all description here will be of TMR2 usage.

First it should be noted that while it is possible for any and all communications on the TMR2 to be encrypted (as will be the case for law enforcement in general), this is not likely to be the case for fire communications.    Listening to fire services on the TMR2 will therefore continue to be possible, if the listener has a digital trunktracking scanner that covers the 700 MHz band and capable of P25 reception.

Whereas the fire departments of Nova Scotia for the most part continue to carry out business on their own VHF systems, the apparent intent of the province is to provide a framework for willing departments to supplement or even replace those VHF systems by migrating to the TMR2.    This encouragement has taken three forms.   First is the provision of the network of trunked radio repeater sites, which are of course there for other reasons as well.  Second is the providing of several radios at no charge to fire departments throughout the province... these are known as "seeded radios" in the hope that departments will go from there and add additional equipment at their own expense.  Third is the formulation of an extensive single talk group plan for use by all rural and town departments and programmed into the seeded radios.

It is acknowledged by the province that dominant use of TMR2 rather than of existing private fire department systems is something that lies well into the future.  On the other hand there had been some usage of the TMR1 network, and the provision of the improved talk group plan of TMR2 may accelerate usage.   There is no doubt that if a sufficient number of trunk radios were provided free to all departments, and appropriate training as well, that TMR2 could take over, for all except the paging aspect of fire services.  It is a matter of finances and willingness.    At this point it is perhaps sufficient to say that TMR1/2 is in limited use in some parts of Nova Scotia for inter-department use while on the way to fire scenes and for communications with dispatch centres, but not for fire scene operations where it is necessary for all firefighters to be on the same channel.  This is something that is currently impossible on TMR due to there not being nearly enough radios to go around.  It is perhaps impractical and unsafe for supervising firefighters to carry both kinds of radios into a firescene and have to switch from one to the other.

The following is the channel plan (sometimes called the "fleetmap") for VFD usage throughout Nova Scotia.   The province has been divided into four areas: Southern (South Shore), Western (Annapolis Valley), Northern (the Northwest), and Eastern (Antigonish, Guysborough and Cape Breton).   Each area has two dispatch channels and fourteen ops channels, as well as two administration channels.    In the chart below, the radio have twelve banks, here called "zones", with three being assigned to each area of the province.    For example "Zones" 1 to 3 are for the Southern area, and so on.   

The first column or bank or zone in each area contains the dispatch and ops channels normally assigned to that area.    Note also that the OPS talk groups are numbered in one series from FD-OPS1 to FD-OPS56, rather than Southern 1 to 14, Western 1 to 14 and so on.

The second column is for the most part the same for all areas, except that it contains the Administration, MFR and HRM channels appropriate for that area.  MFR refers to liaison with EHS for Medical First Responders, whereas HRM channels are as yet undefined in usage but allow for liaison with the HR Fire dispatch centre (IES). 

The third column is in fact the same for all areas, so that columns 3, 6, 9 and 12 are identical.  While this might seem to be wasting radio capacity, there is no pressing need for additional channels, and does allow any one area to confine its radio use to three adjacent banks on the radio.   Note that the provincial MA talk groups are intended for liaison among different public safety agencies at a particular incident and are not intended for one fire department to communicate with another, as they are able to operate on any appropriate FD-OPS talk group.   The COMMON talk groups are intended primarily for communications across provincial boundaries, in case PEI and New Brunswick establish compatible systems.   Some talk groups appearing on this chart do not yet have publicly announced purposes.  Note that while there are four fire department areas, there are only three EHS zones and therefore MFR-W is used in both the Southern and Western fire areas.  There is in fact another EHS zone with an MFR talk group... MFR-C... but that does not appear on this table.  Presumably that talk group is only for use within the inner Halifax area, which is essentially not part of this provincial radio plan. 

During the introduction of TMR2, the COMMON 1 talk group has been used by Bell technical staff for testing and for the distribution and setup of radio equipment to user agencies.   COMMON 2 has been used by provincial PSFC (Public Safety and Field Communications) staff to test coverage and coordinate training of users.   In the future it is expected that Bell technicians and PSFC will move to future dedicated talk groups.

It may be obvious that radios or units from one area could easily be used in another area in case of a disaster or other unforeseen circumstances.

This chart is of the channel plan on the radios, but supplemented with colour codes to indicate which dispatch centre has normal custody (control or use) of the individual OPS talk groups.   This division and that of the Dispatch channels is discussed below.

The two dispatch channels within each zone are divided geographically for normal use.  In the Southern area, Disp A is for Lunenburg and Queens, whereas Disp B is for Shelburne and Yarmouth.  In the Western area, Disp B is for Digby, with Disp A being for Annapolis, Kings and West Hants.   In the Northern area Disp A is for East Hants, Cumberland and Colchester, with B assigned to Pictou.  In the Eastern area, A is for Antigonish, Guysborough and Cape Breton Island in general.  You will note that HRM is excluded from this description, as it takes part in this provincial scheme only to a very limited extent, and has its own separate dispatch and OPS talk groups.
 

 

The OPS channels are divided differently.  In this case these are allocated to the various dispatch centres that operate (or potentially operate) in the area.  Note that Valley Dispatch has OPS talk groups in each of the first three areas.  Yarmouth has talk groups in both the Southern and Western areas. Note that Halifax IES has at least one OPS talk group in each area, as well as one liaison talk group in the second column of each area.  The actual usage of the HRM/IES talk groups is not yet known and may be a long range ability for unforeseen circumstances.  Note that at this time Halifax does dispatch outside departments in both the Western and Northern areas, and therefore may use W DISP A and N DISP A plus the assigned OPS talk groups for those two areas OR it could continue to include these outside departments in its own TMR radio plan, described separately.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  In this channel plan the vast majority of the channels are talk groups on TMR2 however there are also a seven conventional radio channels: three simplex channels shared by all users of the system, and one for use by fire departments, one for backup liaison with EHS Air Medical Transport, and two conventional repeater channels for use at major incidents in conjunction with the province's mobile telecommunications trucks.

 

VFD Talk Group ID List  TMR2

The following chart is of the VFD-specific talk groups with ID numbers, arranged and ordered for easy transfer to, and display on, your own scanner.   In doing so, you would copy only the right two columns. The left column is a descriptor that cannot be entered into the scanner. Please note that conventional frequencies are listed but must be entered separately into your scanner. Alphatags are not the official ones; they have been modified to promote clarity of usage for scanner users.  For example, if I see Fire OPS 11 come up on the display, it is useful to me for the tag to also show that this is a Yarmouth dispatch channel without me having to go and look that up.

VFD F S DISP A L/Q 12047
VFD F S DISP B S/Y 12048
VFD F OPS 1 S SBC 12003
VFD F OPS 2 S SBC 12004
VFD F OPS 3 S SBC 12005
VFD F OPS 4 S SBC 12006
VFD F OPS 5 S SBC 12007
VFD F OPS 6 S SBC 12008
VFD F OPS 7 S HRM 12009
VFD F OPS 8 S VAL 12010
VFD F OPS 9 S VAL 12011
VFD F OPS 10 S VAL 12012
VFD F OPS 11 S YAR 12013
VFD F OPS 12 S YAR 12017
VFD F OPS 13 S YAR 12018
VFD F OPS 14 S YAR 12019
VFD FIRE ADMIN S 1 12049
VFD FIRE ADMIN S 2 12050
VFD F W DISP A AKWH 12001
VFD F W DISP B DIGBY 12002
VFD F OPS 15 W VAL 12020
VFD F OPS 16 W VAL 12021
VFD F OPS 17 W VAL 12022
VFD F OPS 18 W VAL 12023
VFD F OPS 19 W VAL 12024
VFD F OPS 20 W VAL 12025
VFD F OPS 21 W VAL 12026
VFD F OPS 22 W VAL 12027
VFD F OPS 23 W VAL 12031
VFD F OPS 24 W HRM 12032
VFD F OPS 25 W DIG 12033
VFD F OPS 26 W DIG 12034
VFD F OPS 27 W YAR 12035
VFD F OPS 28 W YAR 12036
VFD FIRE ADMIN W 1 12014
VFD FIRE ADMIN W2 12051
VFD FIRE N DISP A WEST 12015
VFD FIRE N DISP B PICT 12016
VFD F OPS 29 N VAL 12037
VFD F OPS 30 N VAL 12038
VFD F OPS 31 N VAL 12039
VFD F OPS 32 N VAL 12040
VFD F OPS 33 N VAL 12041
VFD F OPS 34 N VAL 12052
VFD F OPS 35 N VAL 12053
VFD F OPS 36 N HRM 12054
VFD F OPS 37 N HRM 12055
VFD F OPS 38 N AMH 12056
VFD F OPS 39 N TRU 12057
VFD F OPS 40 N NG 12058
VFD F OPS 41 N STL 12059
VFD F OPS 42 N STL 12060
VFD FIRE ADMIN N1 12028
VFD FIRE ADMIN N2 12061
VFD FIRE E DISP A RUR 12029
VFD FIRE E DISP B CBR 12030
VFD F OPS 43 E CAN 12062
VFD F OPS 44 E CAN 12063
VFD F OPS 45 E CAN 12064
VFD F OPS 46 E CAN 12065
VFD F OPS 47 E CAN 12066
VFD F OPS 48 E CAN 12067
VFD F OPS 49 E SHU 12068
VFD F OPS 50 E SHU 12069
VFD F OPS 51 E HRM 12070
VFD F OPS 52 E CBR 12071
VFD F OPS 53 E CBR 12072
VFD F OPS 54 E CBR 12073
VFD F OPS 55 E CBR 12074
VFD F OPS 56 E CBR 12075
VFD FIRE ADMIN E1 12042
VFD FIRE ADMIN E2 12076
VFD FIRE OPS P1 12043
VFD FIRE OPS P2 12044
VFD FIRE OPS P3 12045
VFD HAZMAT 12046
PNS LIAISE NS MA 1 501
PNS LIAISE NS MA 2 502
PNS LIAISE NS MA 3 503
PNS LIAISE NS MA 4 504
PNS LIAISE NS MA 5 505
PNS LIAISE NS MA 6 506
PNS LIAISE NS MA 7 507
PNS LIAISE NS MA 8 508
PNS LIAISE COMMON 1 509
PNS LIAISE COMMON 2 510
PNS LIAISE PATCH 1 511
PNS LIAISE PATCH 2 512
PNS LIAISE PATCH 3 513
PNS LIAISE MFR-W 520
PNS LIAISE MFR-N 521
PNS LIAISE MFR-E 522
PNS LIAISE RCMP-VOLS1 523
PNS LIAISE RCMP-VOLS2 524
PNS LIAISE SHUBIE 525 525
PNS LIAISE SHUBIE 20000 20000
PNS LIAISE MFR-C 526
PNS LIAISE EHS-VOLS 527
DNR DNR-VFD-1 7001
DNR DNR-VFD-2 7002
DNR DNR-VFD-3 7003
DNR DNR-VFD-4 7004
EHS AMT-AIR 3001
HRFE HRM IES 1 531
HRFE HRM IES 2 532
HRFE HRM IES 3 533
HRFE HRM IES 4 534

Conventional Channels

CONV AMT SX 867.0625
CONV PNS CONV RP1 867.8125
CONV PNS CONV RP2 867.5125
CONV PNS SX ALL 1 866.0125
CONV PNS SX ALL 2 866.5125
CONV PNS SX ALL 3 867.0125
CONV VFD SX 866.8125

 

For interest's sake, the former channel plan for fire usage of TMR1 is presented below.   Note that this becomes OBSOLETE when the migration to TMR2 is completed!

DIAL POSITION

DISPLAY

USE and COMMENT

TALKGROUP ID (or frequency for simplex channels)

A-1

EHS-R

VFD-EHS LIAISON or MFR (Medical First Response) Regionalized. Used by fire departments on medical assist calls to speak to Ambulance dispatch.

Western: 2672
Central: 2704
Northern: 2768
Eastern: 2736

A-2

AMTAIR

VFD-AIRMEDICAL.   For liaison with air ambulance.

36112

A-3

SHUBIE

SHUBIE RADIO

32048

A-4

GSSDNR

For linking to miscl govt departments via Shubie Radio.

33584

A-5

DNR

LIAISON WITH DNR (REGIONALIZED)

Western: 2800
Central: 2864
North: 2928
Eastern: 2896

A-6

DNR

LIAISON WITH DNR (REGIONALIZED)

A-7

RCMP

LIAISON WITH RCMP TELECOMS^

Not known if these actually exist. 

A-8

RCMP

LIAISON WITH RCMP TELECOMS^

A-9

RCMP

LIAISON WITH RCMP TELECOMS^

A-10

RCMP

LIAISON WITH RCMP TELECOMS^

A-11

MA-1

MUTUAL AID 1 (DNR)

40080

A-12

MA-2

MUTUAL AID 2 (DNR)

 40112

A-13

MA-3

MUTUAL AID 3 (EHS)

 40144

A-14

MA-4

MUTUAL AID 4 (EHS)

40176

A-15

MA-5

MUTUAL AID 5 (RCMP)

40208

A-16

MA-6

MUTUAL AID 6 (RCMP)

 40240

B-1

EO-R-1

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 1 (REGIONALIZED)

Western: 37872
Central: 37840
Eastern: 2256

B-2

EO-R-2

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 2 (REGIONALIZED)

 Western: 37808
Central: 37776
Eastern: 2302

B-3

EO-R-3

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 3 (REGIONALIZED)

 Western: 37936
Central: 37744
Eastern: 38128

B-4

EO-R-4

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 4 (REGIONALIZED)

 Western: 37904
Central: 37968
Eastern: 2384

B-5

EO-P1

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PROVINCIAL 1 (rarely used by fire)

2352

B-6

EO-P2

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PROVINCIAL 2 (very rarely used by fire)

 2448

B-7

EO-NB

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS LIAISON WITH NEW BRUNSWICK (extremely rare use, may not be in service)

 38096

B-8

HAZ-R

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESPONSE (REGIONALIZED)

Western: 37648
Central: 37616
Northern: 33296
Eastern: 37584

B-9

REDCRS

RED CROSS LIAISON

33360

B-10

CASARA

Canadian Air Search and Rescue Association LIAISON

 

B-11

ADMLGR

ADMINISTRATION & LOGISTICS (REGIONALIZED)

Western: 38192
Central: 38160
Northern: 38224
Eastern: 2512

B-12

ADMPNS

ADMINISTRATION PROVINCE-WIDE

4752

B-13

   

 

B-14

   

 

B-15

   

 

B-16

LOCAL

INDIVIDUAL FIRE DEPT WORKING CHANNEL  (IF INSTALLED) see below

Brooklyn (Hants) 22096
Kentville 18160
Hantsport 20720
Greenwich 23536
Shubenacadie 21136
BARES (Colchester) 32304
Wolfville 18128
Queens 23984
Liverpool 24112

C-1

VFDSIM

VFD SIMPLEX

866.8125 MHz

C-2

AMTSIM

AIR MEDICAL SIMPLEX

 867.0625 MHz

C-3

SXALL1

ALL PROVINCIAL RADIOS SIMPLEX 1

866.0125 MHz

C-4

SXALL2

ALL PROVINCIAL RADIOS SIMPLEX 2

866.5125 MHz

C-5 TO C-15

-

Unknown, possible ADDITIONAL PROVINCIAL GOVT SIMPLEX CHANNELS

 

C-16

-

SAME AS B-16